Walk Your Dog – Even If You Have A Big Yard.

A nice big, fenced yard can be a great place for a dog to play or hang out with you. But getting out on the town is also essential to your dog’s physical and mental well-being. Here are some of the reasons taking your dog for a walk is so important.

Its Time For Your Walk!

Most people underestimate the amount of exercise their dogs need. Lack of sufficient physical exercise can cause a dog to be frustrated and antsy, which often leads to behavior problems. Many owners think that their yard provides sufficient opportunity for their dogs to burn off steam. In reality, most dogs left out in yards on their own for hours spend most of that time lying around. Those who don’t often get into trouble and develop bad habits: They bark at dogs and people through the fence and come to believe that this is their responsibility; they dig, either through gardens or under fences; they eat poop or even potentially more harmful things.

Physical exercise isn’t your dog’s only need. Dogs need mental stimulation as well; and a backyard can quickly become boring. In order to provide the mental stimulation your dog needs, you need give him access to new sights, smells and experiences. Going for walks with your dog gives him a bit of physical exercise and gives you the opportunity to take him to new places, to smell new smells, and to meet new friends. On top of that, walks are a great time to get in some training, which makes them a great time to strengthen your bond with your dog. If your schedule does not allow for daily walks, there are likely a few high school students in your neighborhood who’d be more than happy to walk your dog for a very reasonable price.

So get out there and make your dog’s day: Take him for a walk!

Guest Contributor–Danielle Grand has spent the last decade working to parlay her affinity for animals into a dog training career. While earning her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, she was involved in an experimental study on canine cognition. She has also obtained her dog training certification from Animal Behavior College and attended numerous dog training seminars conducted by respected behaviorists. At home in New York’s capital region, she works closely with colleagues and mentors to expand her expertise; she hopes to help forge strong, happy relationships between many dogs and their humans.

About admin

Dog Collar Boutique/Dapper Dog Admin
This entry was posted in Dog Training and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Walk Your Dog – Even If You Have A Big Yard.

  1. I agree about getting up off the couch ! I been walking my friends with her a few times a week at the dog park & thats 5 miles they say! I t feels good when I do ,& I enjoy it.I need to get a service dog now so I can do this more !

  2. Danielle Grand says:

    Exactly. Not only do humans require motivation to get off the couch; we NEED to get off the couch. Our bodies are meant to get far more exercise than they get these days. I think that sometimes we forget that; we think that if we need to do some moving, we will. In reality, things like TV are often just too mesmerizing. And we’ve all experienced the feeling of being antsy but not knowing what to do with ourselves. We can assume that these things apply to dogs as well. So sometimes, we need to help them find things to do. And of course, walking our dogs is good for us too.

  3. Jim Witt says:

    It really just comes down to motivation. Just as us humans require a lot of motivation in order to get our butts off the couch and to the gym so do dogs need motivation to get off the grass and get moving. When you play with your dogs they are excited and it gives them the motivation they need to get moving. The same principle applies to walking your dog. It really gets them excited and wanting to move around.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Connect with Facebook

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>